The Troll

 
The history of the Troll dates back to the early days of Palos Heights, when a troll was believed to guard the golf course where the College now stands. As the College has grown, so has the Troll’s image and reputation.
 
“The Troll has been the symbol of Trinity Christian College since our very beginnings, and it continues to represent an integral part of who we are. Though the image may change, we will always be proud to call ourselves Troll Nation” says President Kurt D. Dykstra.
 
Trinity’s Troll received a new look in preparation for the 2017-18 academic year and was unveiled during an August 25 home women’s volleyball match between the defending NCCAA National Champions, Trinity Christian College, and Mt. Mercy University (Cedar Rapids, IA). A sold-out crowd witnessed a video that highlighted past versions of the Troll, and introduced the latest iteration. The video was narrated by Wayne Messmer, nationally recognized as the “voice of the national anthem” for the Chicago Cubs and other professional sports teams. The occasion marked the first significant redesign of the Troll since the 1990s.
 
 
 
Big Ears
Trolls are keen on learning: their large ears allow them to hear more from their professors, coaches and fellow trolls. Troll ears rotate 360º to allow them to adapt and innovate based on their surroundings.
 
Focused Eyes
Troll eyes can focus longer than other creatures, see further distances than eagles, and can clearly see obstacles at night, allowing them to stay ahead of the competition, no matter the scenario.
 
 
Sharp Teeth
Tiger, Lion, Wolverine, and Bear teeth all pale in comparison to the sharpness of Troll teeth. These protruding razor blades are a testament to a Troll's nature of sinking its teeth into large problems and not giving up until its had its fill.
 
Playoff Beard
Bipedal, like Trinity Students, the Troll is a stellar athlete and has the mindset to match. Every test, exam, study session, presentation or other is treated like game 7 of the NBA Finals­—a Troll’s beard represents that constant, consistent drive.